Teacher Newsletter | Pensacola MESS Hall

Teacher Newsletter

Enrich your student’s science experience with the Pensacola MESS Hall. From open exploration or in-depth themed field trips to classroom workshops and science shows, there is a lot to know! Each month, the Teacher Newsletter highlights upcoming and featured programs. Included are a science news brief and hands-on activity curated for you to share with your students.

If you have any questions or comments, the best way to contact us is at groups@pensacolamesshall.org. Tell us what you’re looking for to supplement your students’ science education. Click here for a list of all School Programming.

March Teacher Newsletter

Jump To: Things to Know | Featured Program | Science News | Classroom Activity | Learn More


Things to Know

  • Gulf Coast Science Festival is March 28. Featuring a variety of science- and technology-related activities, all with the goal of inspiring curiosity, experimentation, and creative problem solving by both adults and children. Sat, March 28, Seville Square from 10am – 2pm.
  • Dates are filling up fast for spring semester Field Trips. Visit our page today to learn more and book your class today!
  • Can’t get a bus to come to the MESS Hall? Have us come to you! We can bring a science show with stations or do a hands-on program in your classroom.

Featured Program

Tinker Tots & Math in Every Day If you teach Kindergarten, first, or second grade, add in our Tinker Tots program to your classroom. Young learners are natural scientists. Our Tinker Tots program includes story time and hands-on exploration in small groups. This year’s featured Tinker Tots program, Greed Triangle, explores shapes and important math vocabulary. Program time is ~30 – 45 minutes/class. Fee: $125 per classroom ($75 for each additional program once we’re on site). Math in Every Day If you teach pre-K3 or pre-K4, add Math in Every Day as a special program. This educational series of four, 30 minute lessons seeks to show students & teachers how to find math concepts within storybooks. After reading a story, students are broken into small groups to do hands-on activities exploring science and math questions raised. All activities incorporate math vocabulary and are aligned to Florida educational standards. Book a program today! Visit our Outreach page for details and info on how to book a program.


Science News Brief

What is Coronavirus? Coronaviruses get their name from their shape. These round viruses are surrounded by a halo of spiky proteins. That makes them look a bit like a crown or the corona of the sun. These types of viruses have been around for eons. Certain coronaviruses cause the common cold. While that virus is mild, many coronaviruses have severe effects on humans. These viruses attach to proteins outside the lungs and help the virus penetrate deeper into lung tissue, making them more than just a sniffle-causing cold. Coronaviruses are made up of RNA, a single stranded cousin of DNA. If you look closer at their genes, they are very different genetically. It is their shape that puts them in the same category. There are four main types, labeled with the first four Greek alphabet letters (alpha, beta, gamma, delta). Some severe coronavirus outbreaks in the past are MERS and SARS. The current coronavirus outbreak originating in China has been labeled COVID-19. Some names you may see for the virus that cause this disease are “COVID-19 virus” or “2019nCoV.” People are not the original source of coronavirus diseases. SARS, MERS and COVID-19 are zoonotic. That means that people originally catch the virus responsible from some animal. How COVID-19 was transmitted to humans is currently being researched and debated. There is no cure for coronavirus infections. Doctors can only treat the symptoms. Want to know more? Read the full article on ScienceNewsforStudents.com.


Classroom Science Activity

“Transmission”

Materials

  • Flour or glitter
  • Magnifying glass
  • Handwashing bin with water or classroom sink
  • Soap
  • Towels

Procedure

Round 1

  1. Choose two students to be “infected”. Shake a little flour or glitter on their hands.
  2. Show the “infected” hands to the class.
  3. Have those two students shake hands with two other students each.
  4. Have all the students shake hands with at least two other students.
  5. When all the students have shaken hands with at least two students, call the round to a stop.
  6. Have the students look at their hands for signs of flour or glitter. Record how many people have hands with potential infecting agents.

Round 2

  1. Choose two new students to be “infected”. Shake a little flour or glitter on their hands.
  2. Show the “infected” hands to the class.
  3. Have the infected students wash their hands with soap and water.
  4. Have those two students shake hands with two other students each.
  5. Have all the students shake hands with at least two other students.
  6. When all the students have shaken hands with at least two students, call the round to a stop.
  7. Have the students look at their hands for signs of flour or glitter. Record how many people have hands with potential infecting agents.

What’s going on?

Handwashing with soap removes germs from hands. This helps prevent infections because:

  • People frequently touch their eyes, nose, and mouth without even realizing it. Germs can get into the body through the eyes, nose and mouth and make us sick.
  • Germs from unwashed hands can get into foods and drinks while people prepare or consume them. Germs can multiply in some types of foods or drinks, under certain conditions, and make people sick.
  • Germs from unwashed hands can be transferred to other objects, like handrails, table tops, or toys, and then transferred to another person’s hands.

More Information

Click here for more information on our Classroom Programs. Also, be sure to follow us on Facebook to get the best updates on our upcoming programs and events, both for your classroom and your family.

If you are not already, be sure you are signed up for our monthly Teacher Newsletter to stay up-to-date on what the MESS Hall has to offer, and to receive the science news and activities we share with you!

As always, feel free to email any questions about program details or booking to groups@pensacolamesshall.org.